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Archive for November, 2010

Black hole plasma.

This is the kind of thing you see written and go, “WTF?” I came across this article while I was Stumbling this afternoon and I found it quite unique so I thought I’d share it with you all. All, meaning, the few who have actually been to my blog. Give it a quick read and post a comment letting me know what you think. Like? Don’t like?

It’s not the post I’ve been working on since last night, but it will do until I get that one ready to go.

4-Web_Zoom(2)

Black holes are voracious: They devour large amounts of matter from gas clouds or stars in their neighbourhood. As the incoming “food” spirals faster and faster into the abyss, it becomes denser and denser, and heats up to temperatures of many millions of degrees Celsius. Before the matter finally disappears, it emits extraordinarily intense X-rays into space. This “last cry” originates from iron, one of the elements contained in this matter. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg have collaborated with colleagues at the Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin and used the BESSY II synchrotron X-ray source to investigate what happens in this process.

In order to understand the nature of black holes, it is best to watch them feeding. The most interesting part is just before the matter disappears behind the event horizon – that is, the distance at which the mass attraction of the black hole becomes so strong that not even light can escape. This turbulent process generates X-rays, which in turn excite various chemical elements in the cloud of matter to emit X-rays themselves with characteristic lines (“colours”). An analysis of the lines provides information on the density, velocity and composition of the plasmas near the event horizon.

During this process iron plays an important role. Although it is not as abundant in the universe as lighter elements – mainly hydrogen and helium – it is much better at absorbing and reemitting X-rays. The photons emitted thereby also have a higher energy, respectively a shorter wavelength (a different “colour”), than that of the lighter atoms.

They therefore leave behind clear fingerprints in the rainbow of the dispersed radiation: in the spectrum they reveal themselves as strong lines. The so-called K-alpha line of iron is the final visible spectral signature of matter, its “last cry”, before it disappears behind the event horizon of a black hole, never to be seen again.

The X-rays emitted are also absorbed as they pass through the medium surrounding the black hole at larger distances. And here iron again leaves behind clear fingerprints in the spectra. The radiation ionises the atoms several times and so-called photoionisation typically strips away more than half of the 26 electrons which the iron atoms usually contain. This produces ions with positive charge states that correspond to the number of stripped electrons. The end result is highly charged ions produced not by collisions but by radiation.

It is precisely this process, the stripping of further electrons from highly charged ions by incident X-rays, which researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics have reproduced in the laboratory in collaboration with colleagues at BESSY II – the Berlin synchrotron X-ray source. The heart of the experiment was the EBIT electron beam ion trap designed at the Max-Planck institute. Inside the trap, iron atoms were heated up with the aid of an intense electron beam as they would be deep inside the sun or, as in this case, in the vicinity of a black hole.

Under such conditions, iron exists, for example, as the Fe14+ ion, ionised fourteen times as it were. The experiment proceeds as follows: A cloud of these ions, only a few centimetres long and thin as a hair, is kept suspended in an ultra-high vacuum with the help of magnetic and electric fields. X-rays from the synchrotron then impact on this cloud; the photon energy of the X-rays is selected by a “monochromator” with extreme precision and directed onto the ions as a thin, focused beam.

 Physicists produce black hole plasma in the labThe spectral lines measured in this experiment can be directly and easily compared with the most recent observations made by X-ray observatories, like Chandra and XMM-Newton. It turns out that most of the theoretical calculation methods used do not predict the line positions accurately enough. This is a big problem for the astrophysicists, because without accurate knowledge of the wavelengths there is no accurate determination of the so-called Doppler effect of these lines.

The Doppler effect describes the change in frequency (energy or wavelength) of the emitted light as a function of the velocity of the source (the ions in the plasma.). Anyone who listens to the siren of a passing ambulance experiences this phenomenon: as long as the vehicle approaches, the perceived pitch of the sound is higher; as it moves away, it is lower. If the frequency in the system at rest is known (ambulance is stationary), measuring the pitch makes it possible to determine the velocity of the source – in astronomy this is the plasma.

This left the scientists puzzled over the interpretation of NGC 3783, one of the active galactic nuclei which have been under investigation for the longest time. The error bars in the frequency in a rest frame calculated with the aid of different theoretical models led to such large uncertainties in the derived velocity of the emitting plasma that reliable statements on the plasma flows were no longer possible.

The laboratory measurements of the Heidelberg-based Max-Planck researchers have now identified one theoretical method among several model calculations that provides the most accurate predictions. They also achieved the highest spectral resolution to date in this wavelength range. It had previously not been possible to experimentally check the different theories in this energy range with such high accuracy.

The novel combination of a trap for highly charged ions and bright synchrotron radiation sources thus represents an important step and a new approach for understanding the physics in the plasmas around black holes or active galactic nuclei. The researchers expect the combination of EBIT spectroscopy and brighter and brighter X-ray sources of the third (PETRA III at DESY) and fourth generation (free-electron laser XFEL, Hamburg/Germany; LCLS, Stanford, USA; SCSS, Tsukuba, Japan) to bring fresh drive to this field.

Source: Physorg


I know some secrets. Wanna hear?

Here is a list couple of websites that I have found over time that are either full of information that is useful or they are just entertaining.

#1) Cracked.com – Cracked… Favorite website to visit when I’m bored. It’s got everything you’ve never even thought of before. Seriously. 5 Things You Won’t Believe Aren’t In the BibleThe 5 Most Inspiring Things Ever Accomplished (While Drunk), and The 5 Most Epic One Man Rampages In the History Of War are only three post titles from the homepage that I checked out for this article. Don’t even try and tell me those have crossed your mind before. They haven’t, trust me, but now you want to click on those links and read WTF they are. The untold secrets of Cracked.com behold you just beyond this link. And you can’t turn down America’s Only Humor & Video Site, since 1958. Cracked #2) Lifehacker.com – Lifehacker is a site that is very popular among internet fiends and those alike but not among people that don’t have a clue how to use the internet besides checking their Facebook, Email, or checking their dating site inbox. This is one of the few sites that I believe refers to almost everyone out there whether it be a chef, a bargain hunter, a techie dude, or do-it-yourselfers (my favorite diy site out there somewhere). It’s got everything. Make a Simple Hallway Bench out of IKEA Shelves and Cushions, Better Facebook Makes the New Facebook Font Readable, Adds Tons of Other Tweaks, and Add Baking Soda to Make Acidic Coffee Stomach Friendly. Cruise this site once in a while when you have got a craving to get off your arse and do something. Or make a search if you are looking for something in particular. If you can’t find it here, check the other site I mentioned before.Lifehacker

I will post some more useful websites soon. New post coming this weekend.


Info Session #1 – Google Cheat Sheet

Okay so this one is a pretty neat one if you want to find exactly want you are looking for on google. I have had people come up to me and get me to perform the search for them. The reason I can find it and others can’t is because I have this and you don’t but I am now releasing this glorious triumph to everyone who visits this blog. I will try to post new information daily. Here it is.

[Save it for future reference]

Google Cheat Sheet

Google Cheat Sheet 2


Life is not read-only.

So, I was Stumbling today and came across a site that really caught my attention. It wasn’t the most aesthetically pleasing website. It was really plain to say the least but it got its message across. It’s called free-culture.cc. I haven’t had a chance to read through the different sections but I did have a good look over the Free Content section and watched the videos on there. It’s all about the Creative Commons licence. A licence which gives you the ability to decide the regulations on your products instead of having them controlled by governments and other bull shit people/organizations. Check it out. FREE-CULTURE.CC.

Also, while you’re at it, check out www.lifeisnotreadonly.net


Permanently Delete Unwanted Accounts

We all have an increasing number of sites and online services we’re members of, and sometimes it all gets a little overwhelming. At times, we just need to delete our memberships to some sites, either in an effort to simplify our lives or just because we’ve grown tired of a particular site or service.

What we often don’t realize when signing up for all these accounts, though, is how difficult it can be to permanently delete our accounts when we’ve had enough. Some require complicated, multi-step processes that can stretch over the course of days (or weeks). Others take less time, but still require multiple steps by the user.

 

Below we’ll take a look at the account deletion processes of popular websites and services, and how easy or difficult they make it. Then we’ll discuss why sites make things so complicated, and some things to consider when designing your own deletion policies.

[Offtopic: by the way, did you know that we are publishing a Smashing eBook Series? The brand new eBook #3 is Mastering Photoshop For Web Design, written by our Photoshop-expert Thomas Giannattasio.]

Facebook

Facebook in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty (on a scale of 1-5, 5 being hardest): 5

Deleting a Facebook account is a bit more complicated than many other services. There are two options for getting rid of your FB account, one that’s permanent and complete, and one that lets you change your mind later.

If you just want to shut down your account for a little while, with the option to reactivate it later, you can deactivate your account. This is simple: just go into your account settings and click on the “deactivate account” link. This immediately makes your account invisible to everyone else on Facebook. If you decide at a later date that you want to reactivate your account, it’s as simple as reactivating.

If you’re looking for something a little more permanent, though, you’ll need to submit a request to Facebook. The tricky thing here, though, is that they don’t immediately delete your account, and if at any time before it’s permanently deleted you log in or otherwise interact with Facebook, your deletion request will be canceled. For that reason, it’s a good idea to go around to any computers or devices (like your mobile phone) that you access your account through and log out (deleting saved passwords is also a good idea to prevent an accidental login).

Then you can use the form found here to request deletion. Remember not to log into your account at any point after that. There doesn’t seem to be any official notice on how long it takes, but unofficial reports say 14 days. To be on the safe side, you may want to wait a month or more before attempting to login to confirm your account has been deleted.

More information on deleting your Facebook account can be found in their FAQs.

Twitter

Twitter in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 2

In contrast to deleting a Facebook account, deleting a Twitter account is relatively easy. All you need to do is go into your account settings and click on the “Deactivate my account” link at the bottom of the page. This is a permanent deactivation, though it can take up to a month for your account and information to disappear entirely from their system.

One word of warning, though: if you think you might want to use your email address, username or phone number on Twitter in the future, make sure that you change them prior to deactivating your account. Whether these things are permanently blocked from Twitter in the future or only temporarily isn’t specified, but it’s a good idea to change them anyway.

You can find more information on deleting your Twitter account here.

MySpace

Myspace in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 4

Deleting a MySpace account is a bit convoluted, but doable. You’ll need to login to your account and then go to the “My Account” link, and then select “Account”. Scroll until you see the “Account Cancellation” section and click on “Cancel Account”. This is where it gets a little bit complicated. MySpace will then send you an email with instructions for completing your account cancellation. Except the email doesn’t come right away, and can take a couple of days to show up. Once you get the email, it asks you for confirmation again that you want to delete your account, but then deletes it immediately.

All of the above works just fine, as long as you still have access to the email address you signed up with. But as so often happens when we finally decide to clean up our online accounts, some of them may be associated with outdated email or other accounts. In that case, there are a few alternatives listed by MySpace. The first one is to edit your profile and replace everything in your “About Me” box with “REMOVE PROFILE” and then contact MySpace and tell them to delete your profile (including your friend ID or URL). If that doesn’t work (say, if you can’t login to your account at all), you can just contact MySpace and ask them to delete the profile. How quickly they actually do so isn’t specified.

Official instructions for deleting your account can be found here.

LinkedIn

Linkedin in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 3

LinkedIn makes it quite easy to delete your account, once you know where to look. Click on “Settings” in the upper-right of the screen once you’re logged into your account, and then select “Close Your Account” under “Personal Information”. You’ll then be prompted for the reason you’re closing your account, and once confirmed, your account will be deleted.

As far as social networking sites go, LinkedIn probably has the most straight-forward account closure process. More details can be found here.

Google

Google in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 3

Considering how pervasive Google is in our digital existence, you’d think deleting your Google account might be incredibly complicated. After all, many of us use dozens of Google services, and you’d think each one would require separate deletion.

For the most part, deleting your entire Google account is easy. There are only a few services that require special consideration. Of course, with the exception of a couple of services, there’s no way to delete individual services completely from your Google account. For example, with Analytics, you can delete each individual site you’re tracking, but not the Analytics account itself.

To delete your main Google account, login through the Google Accounts homepage. Then click on “Edit” next to “My Products”. From that page, you can delete certain services (Orkut and Web History), as well as delete your entire account by clicking on “Clear account and delete all services and info associated with it”. This will take you to a form where you’ll need to confirm each of the services you’ll be deleting. If you linked your Google account to an existing YouTube account, you’ll need to delete that account separately.

Then you’ll need to confirm your password, and check that you do, indeed, want to close your account, and that you know you’re still responsible for any pending financial transactions associated with your account. Then confirm, and your account will be deleted.

Certain services, including Google Alerts, Groups, and Docs, aren’t automatically deleted in this way. To unsubscribe from alerts, you’ll need to refer back to your original Alerts email (or from any Alerts email you’ve since received) and click the ‘unsubscribe’-link there. For Groups, you’ll also need to unsubscribe from each group.

Google Docs leaves shared documents and presentations available to collaborators and viewers. Spreadsheets, on the other hand, aren’t available to collaborators or viewers once you’ve deleted your account (so have a collaborator create a copy of the spreadsheet prior to deleting your account). With shared documents and presentations, you’ll want to reassign ownership to another user before deleting your account.

Full details on deleting your Google account can be found on the Google’s Help page “Deleting: Your Google Account”.

Ebay

Ebay in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 3

Ebay makes it fairly easy to close your account, though they do impose a waiting period. All you need to do is make sure your account has a zero balance, and then click the link to request your account be closed on this page.

One caveat: if you think you might want to use your email address for another Ebay account in the future, make sure that you change it prior to deleting your account. Email addresses and user IDs cannot be reused in the future. Once the waiting period has ended, your account will be deleted and your feedback ratings and other information will no longer be visible. Whether that information is permanently deleted or stored on a server somewhere ad infinitum isn’t specified.

Wikipedia

Wikipedia in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: Impossible

Wikipedia is one of the few websites out there that doesn’t allow you to delete your account. That’s right, once you have a Wikipedia account, you have it forever. There is some hope, though, if you really don’t want to be associated with it any longer.

In most cases, accounts can be renamed and your user page can be deleted, along with (in some cases) your user talk pages. While this doesn’t erase your tracks entirely, it does effectively let you vanish from the site.

Wikipedia’s reasoning behind this is that all contributions have to be assigned to someone. They can’t have anonymous or orphaned contributions, or it would potentially ruin the crowdsourced and open nature of the site.

Flickr/Yahoo!

Flickr in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 2

Deleting your account on Flickr is relatively easy. Once you’ve logged into your account, go to your account settings and click on the “Personal Information” tab. From there, click the link “Delete your Flickr account”. A warning screen will come up that informs you that the deletion is permanent, and that all of your photos and videos will be deleted.

Deleting your entire Yahoo! account is a separate step. Log into your account and then go to the account deletion page. This page explains what happens when you delete your account. User information is kept on Yahoo!’s active servers for 90 days after the deletion has been requested, and may persist in backups beyond that. Once you’ve read the information on the page, you have to enter your password, a captcha code and then confirm that you want to delete your account. One thing to remember: if you’ve signed up for any Yahoo! premium services, you may still be billed for those after your account has been terminated, so make sure you cancel those premium services before you delete your account.

Windows Live

Windowslive in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 2

Closing your Windows Live account is actually surprisingly easy. There’s only a problem if you’re using that account to access other websites. If so, you’ll need to go to each website where you’re using your Windows Live login credentials and delete your accounts there prior to deleting the Live account itself. If you don’t, you won’t be able to delete those accounts (or do anything with them) once your Live ID is deactivated.

Now, once you’ve verified that all your accounts linked to your Live ID have been closed, all you need to do is go to your Windows Live account and click on the “Close your account” link at the bottom under “Other Options”. This will bring up a page that tells you what happens when your account is closed. This includes that your registered information will be permanently deleted, that some information might not be deleted (refer to their privacy statement for details on that), and that if you have associated children’s accounts with that Live ID, they will also be deactivated. To finish the deletion process, you have to type in your password and click “Yes”.

There are reports that at this point you may be told there is a Microsoft email account associated with your account, and that your account cannot be closed. From there, you just need to click on “Close your Microsoft account” and then “Close my account”.

Stumbleupon

Stumbleupon in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 1

Stumbleupon is one of the easiest web services to delete your account from. Just go to their delete account page, enter your user ID/nickname and password, and click on “Delete Account”. That’s it! Account deletions are permanent, so make sure you really want to delete your account before clicking that “Delete Account” button.

WordPress.com

Wordpress in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: Impossible

WordPress.com doesn’t allow you to delete your account. Instead, they recommend you simply leave the account inactive. If you’re worried about the information you’ve uploaded to your WordPress.com account, remember you can always delete the information contained in the account (or replace it with false information).

Start by deleting your blogs. To do that, go to Tools and then “Delete Site”. There’s an email confirmation step required. You may want to run an export of your site’s content first, just so you have a backup in case you ever want to repost or reuse any of it (or just for posterity). After that, you can replace your email address and other identifying information with alternative information. More information can be found on this page and this one.

Amazon

Amazon in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 3

Closing your Amazon account requires you to contact their customer service department to request the account to be closed. This can only be done if you have no pending transactions, so make sure you’ve either received or cancelled all recent orders.

The email to customer service has to be sent from the email-address associated with your account. Other than that, they don’t give any indication of either how long it might take to delete the account or if there are additional confirmation steps involved.

YouTube

Youtube in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 3

If your YouTube account was set up with your Google account login credentials (as in, you used your Google account to sign up for your YouTube account), it’s automatically deleted when you delete your Google account. But if you set it up separately from your Google account (or linked the accounts together after they were both set up, or if you want to keep your Google account), you’ll need to delete it separately. One thing to note is that deleting your account does not delete your videos or channel, just your profile information. You’ll need to delete those prior to deleting your account.

The deletion process is pretty straightforward, though it does have a few more steps than are really necessary. Log in to your account and then go to “Manage” from the drop-down menu under your user name. Then click on “Manage Account” and then “Delete Account”. It will then ask you why you want to delete your account. Fill that in and then click the “Delete Account” button. YouTube then brings up a window that reminds you that your videos will not be deleted, only your profile. If you’ve deleted your videos and channel (or opted not to), then click on “Delete Account” one more time. You then have to confirm one more time. After that, try logging into your account again to make sure it’s been deleted.

PayPal

Paypal in How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites

Difficulty: 1

Closing a PayPal account is pretty simple. Just log in to your account, and then click on your “Profile” link. From there, click on the “Close Account” link in the “Account Information” column. You’ll be prompted to continue from there and then you’ll need to click the “Close Account” button.

You’ll want to make sure your account is current and that there are no pending transactions, and of course you’ll want to transfer the positive balance to your bank account. There are reports that if you delete your PayPal account, it’s more difficult to get another one in the future (as in, they require more information of you). Whether this is true or not is unconfirmed.

Why’s It So Complicated?

In the case of every service mentioned above, properly deleting your account is a multi-step process. Some sites are even more difficult. It’s not a technical issue, obviously, as programming a functionality to let users delete their own accounts is something most competent developers could do before breakfast.

So why do some sites make it so complicated? The answer is user retention. They don’t want you to delete your account. The hope is that if you have the account, you’ll use it at least occasionally, if for no other reason than curiosity about things you might have missed when you weren’t logged in. As soon as you delete that account, though, it’s an out-of-site-out-of-mind kind of thing. You’re less likely to sign up for another account if you decided you could live without it once.

Account Deletion Remorse

This is one very valid reason to make it more complicated to delete an account: deletion remorse. It’s not uncommon for a user to have a bad day, get angry about something going on within a social network, and decide they’ve had enough and are getting rid of their account.

Of course, what often happens is that a day or two later they realize how much they loved using that social network, and they wish they could get their account back. With account deletion policies like those of Facebook (on which I’ve witnessed such account deletion remorse first-hand), users can just reactivate their account, and have all of their old friends and information right there. On sites with more immediate deletion policies, that user would likely have to start over entirely.

Should You Use Complicated Account Deletion Processes?

Considering how many major sites out there have complex methods for deleting accounts, should this be industry standard? Should all sites employ these methods to help retain users who can’t be bothered to follow a multi-step process? Probably not.

There are a few things to consider when deciding whether you want to make it complicated for a user to delete their account. First of all, if your deletion process is going to be handled by customer service representatives, do you have the manpower to do so? If you suddenly have a thousand members who want to delete their accounts, do you have the resources to handle that?

Do you expect users to regularly delete their accounts just to sign up for a new one a week later? If it’s complicated to delete their account, they may never sign up for another one, not wanting to go through the process again.

Inactive accounts can also eat up your system resources. Server space can become an issue, especially on very popular sites (or sites with very low budgets). Plus, it makes maintenance and backups more intensive, since there’s more data to deal with. Making it easier for people to delete their accounts if they’re not using your service can help relieve that load.

The level of complexity for the account deletion process is something that needs to be considered on a site-by-site basis. In general, the easier the process is, the better; however, it is important to make sure that users may be having a bad day and make a mistake by closing an account and so they will be happy about getting the account back a couple of days after it was closed.

Making the process way too difficult and time-consuming will turn annoyed customers in angry ones, the ones who will be very likely to spread negative word out there, while annoyed users would probably just close the account and move on, and even maybe come back to the service later. In either case, one way to minimize your worries about it, though, is to keep your users happy and conduct your site’s business in a transparent and open way.

[Written by Cameron Chapman on Smashing Magazine.]

 


OMG! LOOK AT THOSE DRAGONS!

Zach Galifianakis. He’s very unique in the IDGAF kind of way. I appreciate it. I WOULD NOT TOLERATE SUCH DISRESPECT ON MY TV SHOW!! Just kidding… but I’d punch him if he smoked weed at my table. Maybe. It’s Mr. Hangover dude. We’d be the three bestfriends that anyone could ever have…


Wow… but why?

Oh my...

“Convicted forger A. Schiller was serving his time in Sing
Sing prison in the late 1800s when guards found him dead in
his cell. On his body they found seven regular straight pins
whose heads measured the typical 47/1000ths of an inch or
1.17 millimeters in diameter. Under 500 magnification it was
found that the tiny etchings seen on the heads of the pins
were the words to The Lord’s Prayer, which is 65 words and
254 letters long. Of the seven pins, six were silver and one
was gold – the gold pin’s prayer was flawless and a true
masterpiece. Schiller had spent the last 25 years of his life
creating the pins, using a tool too small to be seen by the
naked eye. It is estimated that it took 1,863 sepatate carving
strokes to make it. Schiller went blind because of his
artwork.”

[http://www.anomalies-unlimited.com/Prayer.html]

Okay now… was there an actual purpose to him doing this and ruining his eyesight? And who the hell decided to magnify the pinhead 500x? This person must have got a new microscope and is looking at everything 500x its normal size.


Bricked Storage?

usbwall1.jpg

Okay guys. In New York, people have planted USB drives randomly in walls and curbs. You may be a bit confused by this but it is actually quite interesting. It’s for random p2p file sharing. Someone uploads a file by plugging in their laptops and downloads another file. It’s kind of a game in a way. This is a great idea from my point of view because you’ll never know what you’ll get which makes it exciting. Until the tragedy of virus’s become frequent of these random USB drives. Personally, if I stumbled across one of these while wandering with my MacBook, I would definitely plug in! Curiosity killed the cat, but I’m not a cat so whatever.

usbwall2.jpg

[Dead Drops VIA MAKE]

 


Endtroduction?

End-troduction? Well, it simply means that this post is my first but it will always be at the end of my blog on the last page, but it’s also the introduction. It begins with my name, Ethan. I’m computer savvy, love to listen to electronic music (preferably house), and I’m very intrigued by the latest gadgets on the market and soon to be on the market. I have a 3 months-old brindle Pit Bull Terrier who happens to be my best friend and he is sleeping on my lap at this moment. His name is Misfit. I’ll post a picture of him here in the next post. I’m an 18 year young guy that attends Building Futures in Calgary, Canada.  My blog is going to be mostly updated daily or every other day with interesting stuff I find around the web or see in my day to day life.

Got a question or suggestion? Send me some emails!